Above the Fold Keystone XL | Page 2 | U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Above the Fold Keystone XL

A welder near Atoka, Oklahoma. Photo credit: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg.
68% of registered voters back building and oil pipeline between Canada and the U.S.
Sean Hackbarth
Grain rail cars.
The pipeline would free up enough capacity to move 11 grain trains—3.85 million bushels—daily.
Sean Hackbarth
Three sections of pipe for the Keystone XL pipeline in Atoka, Oklahoma.
Just as the original Keystone pipeline has safely moved oil and made a positive contribution, so too will the Keystone XL pipeline… when President Obama finally pulls it out of permitting limbo.
Sean Hackbarth
Pipe to be used for the Keystone XL pipeline in a field in Gascoyne, ND.
For months, the State Department has refused to turn over comments from other agencies on the energy infrastructure project.
Sean Hackbarth
Oil pumps stand at the Chevron Corp. Kern River oil field in Bakersfield, California.
California is producing types of oil that--from a greenhouse gas emissions perspective--is similar to Canadian oil sands.
Sean Hackbarth
U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.
How about President Obama approve one oil pipeline?
Sean Hackbarth
Jim Doolittle at the Doolittle/Wagner Ranch.
The people who would be most affected have weighed the costs and benefits and come out in favor of it.
Sean Hackbarth
EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy.
The State Department finds that not building it would result in more greenhouse gas emissions.
Sean Hackbarth