Jun 29, 2015 - 9:30am

What Will EPA’s Ozone Standard Cost Illinois?

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A worker fills a form with concrete at Doty & Sons Concrete Products in Sycamore, Ill.
A worker fills a form with concrete at Doty & Sons Concrete Products in Sycamore, Ill. Photo credit: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg.

This fall, EPA will release a stringent new ozone standard that will put up another barrier keeping businesses from investing and creating jobs.

On Monday in Chicago, the U.S. Chamber, the Illinois Black Chamber of Commerce, and the National Black Chamber of Commerce are hosting a symposium keynoted by Harry Alford, head of the National Black Chamber, on the economic and employment impacts of the ozone proposal in Chicago, Illinois, and minority communities.

Follow the happenings on Twitter using #OzoneRegs.

Prior to the event, Illinois Black Chamber of Commerce CEO Larry Ivory spoke with The Ujamaa Network.

Q: What is the impact of Ozone Regulation and how will it affect jobs in Illinois?

Larry: Proposed changes to tighten national ozone standards could put local jobs at risk and limit opportunities for economic development in Illinois. The potential impact on Illinois is significant: an ozone standard of 65 ppb could lead to an estimated loss of 34, 873 jobs or job equivalents per year, $9 billion in total compliance costs, and a $640 drop in average household consumption per year.

Q: Tell the readers about this gathering being planned this month to address this very important initiative?

Larry: The gathering will feature industry experts and local leaders discussing how changes to the ozone standard could impact Illinois communities. We'll hear a keynote address from Harry Alford of the National Black Chamber of Commerce. We'll also hear from local leaders like Frank Clark of the Business Leadership Council and George Williams of PMI Energy Solutions and the American Association of Blacks in Energy.

Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions to help them better understand the impacts that these ozone regulations could have on their communities, families, and jobs.

Q: Who is involved? 

Larry: The event is sponsored by the Illinois Black Chamber of Commerce, the National Black Chamber of Commerce, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Q: What roll does the IBCC play in this sensitive issue? 

Larry: The Illinois Black Chamber of Commerce hopes to be an educator on this important topic, especially because so many Illinois businesses and communities may not be aware of the serious impacts the proposed ozone standards could have on them. The Illinois Black Chamber of Commerce wants to help raise awareness of the potential impacts that so many Illinois communities could face if these proposed national ozone standards are put into effect.

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