May 20, 2015 - 9:00am

When Being COOL Costs Jobs: Retaliation by Canada & Mexico Puts U.S. Workers at Risk


Former Senior Vice President, Americas

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U.S. Chamber of Commerce Senior Vice President for International, John Murphy, speaking at a press conference with members of Congress on the need to repeal COOL in Washington, DC on May 19, 2015. Photo by Ian Wagreich / © U.S. Chamber of Commerce
U.S. Chamber of Commerce Senior Vice President for International, John Murphy, speaking at a press conference with members of Congress on the need to repeal COOL in Washington, DC on May 19, 2015. Photo by Ian Wagreich / © U.S. Chamber of Commerce

The World Trade Organization (WTO) issued its final ruling in the long-running trade dispute brought by our two largest trading partners, Canada & Mexico, with regard to the U.S. Country-of-Origin-Labeling (COOL) program for muscle cuts of beef, pork, and chicken.

After years of trade litigation, this final ruling by the WTO has made one thing clear, the United States is out of options.

Canada and Mexico can now turn to implementing retaliatory tariffs that would hit hard against U.S. farmers, workers, and companies.  As our two North American neighbors, trade reaches $1.3 trillion annually and supports nearly 14 million jobs.

And we aren’t just jeopardizing those U.S. jobs today, there’s the additional risk that sourcing managers could shift their future purchase to other jurisdictions in response to the threat of higher tariff costs.

Understanding the devastating impact that the WTO ruling can have on the U.S. economy, House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway will hold a mark-up of bill H.R. 2393, legislation that seeks to repeal country-of-origin labeling requirements for beef, pork and poultry.

For the sake of American farmers, workers, and companies, the U.S. Chamber is calling on Congress to advance this piece of legislation and repeal the COOL rule for meat now. 

About the Author

About the Author

Former Senior Vice President, Americas

Jodi Hanson Bond is former senior vice president of the Americas, International Affairs Division.