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National Security Task Force

The National Security Task Force is responsible for the development and advancement of Chamber policy related to homeland security and national security.  Chaired by Governor Tom Ridge (the first Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security) the Task Force is comprised of over 170 companies, associations, and state and local chambers, represents a broad spectrum of the American economy the Task Force engages Capitol Hill, the administration and international governments to advance priorities related to cyber security, supply chain, customs and trade facilitation, public private partnerships and emergency preparedness.

The Task Force’s working groups on Cyber Security and Global Supply Chain Security identify current and emerging issues, craft policies and aggressively pursue reforms through advocacy.  Among the top priorities include: promoting effective supply chain, customs and trade facilitation policies that support the free movement of goods in the global supply chain to enhance U.S. global competitiveness and engaging policymakers to focus on collaboration, flexibility, and cost reduction as both industry and the administration work to develop a cybersecurity framework.

 

Timeline

The latest updates across all U.S. Chamber properties

E.g., 06/25/2015
E.g., 06/25/2015
Event

Join us on Wednesday, September 16 in Minneapolis, MN for a half day roundtable conversation with leading public and private cybersecurity experts.

0 sec ago
Letter

Chamber decries heavy cuts to NIST. A letter Tuesday from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce underlined NIST's "subtle but vital role in the development of American science and technology, including cybersecurity," and urged the committee to reconsider the cuts. "The Chamber is concerned that dramatically reducing NIST's budget could pull the rug from under the agency and industry on cybersecurity," writes Executive VP R Bruce Josten.

4 days 14 hours ago
Blog
Illustration of John Dillinger in a laptop related to cybersecurity.

Today's criminals are the equivalent of John Dillinger with a laptop, according to FBI Director James Comey. And he's right. Cybercrime cost the economy $782 million in 2013--a massive jump from $17.8 million in 2001, according to a recent study.

6 months 4 weeks ago
Blog
Author: 

In the era of Edward Snowden and NSA privacy issues, businesses and consumers are focusing more and more on cybersecurity and online protection of property - specifically intellectual property (IP).

11 months 1 week ago
Blog
Author: 

Reducing red tape and unnecessary barriers in the global supply chain decreases the cost of trade, raises standards of living and is a competitive necessity for any country looking to compete in the 21st century. A commercially meaningful single window is a critical first step.

11 months 1 week ago
Blog
Thomas J. Donohue, President and CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Precautions must be taken at every step in the supply chain, which is often where criminals find points of vulnerability. So corporations that contract or work with small businesses should help inform their partners of threats and urge them to adopt forward-leaning cyber practices.

11 months 1 week ago