Randel K. Johnson

Former Senior Vice President, Labor, Immigration, and Employee Benefits

Johnson is the former Senior Vice President, Labor, Immigration, and Employee Benefits.

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Providing Legislative Relief for DACA Recipients: Just Do It

Congress has the opportunity to work with the president to craft legislation that will provide some clarity to DACA recipients.

Republicans, Democrats, & Independents Agree: Lawmakers Must Fund Cost Sharing Reductions

If the administration chooses to stop making cost sharing reduction payments, we know what will happen: the costs of coverage will soar.

Mulvaney's Unique Opportunity To Help Undo The Last Eight Years

Earlier this week, a group of 27 trade associations – lead by the Chamber of Commerce – asked Director Mulvaney to stay or rescind EEOC.

Private Retirement Benefits and Social Security Working Together

The true success story is the combination of Social Security and employer-provided retirement benefits.‎

Proposed Overtime Regulation Threatens Nonprofits and State, Local Governments

While much attention on the impact of the proposed changes in the overtime regulations has rightly been on how typical for-profit employers will have to adjust, what has not gotten adequate attention is the impact the new rule will have on nonprofit employers as well as state and local governments.

Myths Behind the White House Worker Voice Summit

and Glenn Spencer  10/6/2015

The White House will host a summit Wednesday dedicated to what it calls “worker voice.” This term could mean many things to different people, but to the administration it means unions. The summit, it seems, will be largely devoted to proclaiming the value of unions and convincing workers that rebuilding the power of organized labor is the key to restoring the middle class, increasing wages, and reversing income inequality. However, the evidence to support this thesis is patchy at best...

Thank You, American Workers! Here is How American Employers Support Their Employees

In 2013, employers spent $8.8 trillion on total compensation for their employees: $7.1 trillion in wages and salaries; $1.7 trillion on benefits.