Sheryll Poe

Sheryll Poe is a former senior writer at the U.S. Chamber, who covered public policies affecting businesses including the three "T's" - transportation, trade and taxes.

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The High Cost of Doing Nothing on Infrastructure Investment

To demonstrate to Washington policymakers the groundswell of public support for repairing, rebuilding, and revitalizing America’s aging transportation system, the U.S. Chamber has relaunched the FasterBetterSafer Campaign.

Make Sure You’re Heard. Register to Vote Today.

With 471 members of Congress -- including the entire House of Representatives – and governors in 36 states on the ballot this November, it is critical that all Americans make their voices heard, either on Election Day or by voting early.

New Report Shines Light on How CFPB Collects and Tracks Information

“The CFPB’s massive data collection effort is an unwarranted, unwelcome intrusion into the private financial lives of millions of Americans,” says Senate Banking Committee's Mike Crapo.

Outraged City Sues Man for Filing a Frivolous Lawsuit

The City of Greensburg, Pennsylvania is trying to recoup a bit of green back into city coffers after a federal lawsuit alleging police brutality was dismissed for lack of merit.

Federal Water Rule Would Mean a Less Happy 'Happy Hour'

America’s beer ingredient suppliers are hopping mad over a proposal to extend federal regulatory authority over bodies of water.

Tech, Business Groups to Congress: Don't Hit the 'Delete' Button on the Fourth Amendment

September 17 -- Constitution Day — is about celebrating the foundation of our democracy. However, one of our current freedoms, storage and access to electronic data, is being threatened.

EPA Extends Carbon Rule Comment Period

Bowing to pressure from governors, state regulators, business and labor groups, and 53 senators (among a slew of others), the EPA announced that it is extending by 45 days the public comment period for its carbon rule.

VIDEO: Ice Cream, Airplane Parts, and 200,000 More Reasons to Support Ex-Im

200,000 Reasons to Support Ex-Im Bank

Failure to reauthorize Ex-Im would put at risk the more than 200,000 American jobs at 3,400 companies that depend on Ex-Im to compete in global markets.