Financial Regulation

Capital goes where it is welcome, where it feels safe, and where it has a reasonable opportunity to earn a profit.  To maintain and advance its global leadership in capital formation, the United States must have the most fair, efficient, and innovative capital markets in the world. We can’t achieve this without a modern and coherent financial services regulatory system.

In many ways, the government is moving us further away from well-functioning, well-regulated capital markets by producing a maze of overlapping, contradictory, and duplicative financial regulations. The U.S. Chamber is fighting for the kind of financial rulemaking that protects consumers and investors, encourages reasonable risk taking, doesn’t constrain innovation and growth or allow special interest groups to advance their agendas at the expense of all investors, and is coordinated with other economies and among the many domestic agencies that issue financial regulations.

 

 

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Timeline

The latest updates across all U.S. Chamber properties

E.g., 04/27/2017
E.g., 04/27/2017
Testimony

Tom Quaadman's testimony for the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Securities, and Investment hearing: "Examining the Impact of the Volcker Rule on Markets, Businesses, Investors, and Job Creation."

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 9:00am
Testimony

Tom Quaadman's testimony for House Financial Services Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Securities, and Investment hearing: "The JOBS Act at Five: Examining Its Impact and Ensuring the Competitiveness of the U.S. Capital Markets"

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 11:00am