Health Care

In many ways, U.S. health care is the envy of the world—it has helped many individuals live longer than ever and enjoy a better quality of life than previously possible. However, we continue to face the challenge of making quality health care more affordable, more accessible, and more reliable for all Americans. 

The Chamber is focused on promoting effective private sector solutions to our health care challenges that will help control costs, expand access, and improve the quality of care.

The Chamber's health care priorities include:

  • Advancing successful ideas from the private sector that reduce costs, advance quality, and improve health
  • Promoting reforms that provide relief to employers and employees as the ACA is implemented including:
    • Reducing the harm of the employer mandate by restoring the 40-hour work week;
    • Repealing taxes that increase premiums and cost jobs such as the 40% excise tax, medical device tax, and the health insurance tax; and
    • Improving flexibility for tax-preferred accounts that encourage careful health care spending like FSAs, HSAs, and HRAs
  • Raising awareness of the positive effects of wellness and chronic disease management programs in the workplace to improve health and productivity
  • Expanding access to coverage and services by strengthening the employer-sponsored system

Projects and Programs

Recent Activity

LetterJul 11, 2018 - 10:45am

House Ways and Means Committee Markup

This letter was sent to the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Ways and Means Committee ahead of a markup this afternoon.

Above the FoldJun 25, 2018 - 9:00am
AHPs

A Health Care Victory for Small Businesses

The Chamber applauds the administration for its new rule expanding Association Health Plans (AHPs).

ReportJun 25, 2018 - 6:00am

The Economic Cost of Disease

This report estimates the economic cost of health-related productivity losses, profiling eighteen countries, ranging from industrialized markets such as the United States and Japan, to developing markets such as Kenya and Indonesia.

ReportJun 22, 2018 - 2:30pm

Economic Costs of Absenteeism, Presenteeism and Early Retirement Due to Ill Health: A Focus on Saudi Arabia

This report provides estimates of the economic cost due to productivity losses arising from absenteeism, presenteeism and early retirement due to ill health. For Saudi Arabia, these losses equate to a total of 9.7% of GDP by 2030 as shown in Table ES1. This is the largest impact of any of the countries included in this study as comparator countries. The majority are middle income developing countries from around the globe, although the US, Japan and Singapore are also included.

ReportJun 22, 2018 - 2:30pm

Economic Costs of Absenteeism, Presenteeism and Early Retirement Due to Ill Health: A Focus on South Africa

This report provides estimates of the economic cost due to productivity losses arising from absenteeism, presenteeism and early retirement due to ill health. For South Africa, these losses equate to a total of 6.7% of GDP in 2015 as shown in Table ES 1, increasing to 7.0% of GDP by 2030.

ReportJun 22, 2018 - 2:30pm

Noncommunicable Diseases In South Africa: A Call To Action

The World Health Organization predicts NCDs will become the leading cause of death in Sub-Saharan Africa by 2030. Productivity losses related to ill health cost South Africa 6.7% GDP a year, rising to 7.0% GDP by 2030.

ReportJun 22, 2018 - 1:30pm

Economic Costs of Absenteeism, Presenteeism and Early Retirement Due to Ill Health: A Focus on Jiangsu, China

This report provides estimates of the economic cost due to productivity losses arising from absenteeism, presenteeism and early retirement due to ill health. For Jiangsu, these losses equate to a total of 5.3% of GDP in 2015, as shown in Table ES 1, increasing to 6.3% of GDP by 2030.

ReportJun 22, 2018 - 1:15pm

Why Noncommunicable Diseases: Need for Shift in Policy Agenda

Out of the total 605,000 deaths in Mexico in 2014, NCDs are accountable for 77% (465,850) and accidents and injuries contribute another 12%.

ReportJun 22, 2018 - 1:15pm

Economic Costs of Absenteeism, Presenteeism and Early Retirement Due to Ill Health: A Focus on Brazil

This report provides estimates of the economic cost due to productivity losses arising from absenteeism, presenteeism and early retirement due to ill health. For Brazil these losses equate to a total of 8.7% of GDP as shown in Table ES 1. This puts Brazil towards the upper end of the range for a group of 10 other countries that includes some of its Latin American peers as well as other middle income developing countries from other parts of the world.

ReportJun 21, 2018 - 10:00am

Noncommunicable Diseases in Columbia: A Call to Action

Colombia suffers from a triple burden of disease with a focus on noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.