Financial Regulation

Businesses of all sizes need well-functioning and multi-faceted capital markets. Excessive and unnecessary banking and securities regulations constrain access to capital for businesses, making it harder for them to form and grow. The Chamber believes a free and efficient capital market system is essential to economic growth and innovation.

In addition, public companies are facing increasing outside pressure to focus on short term gains and special interests over long term wellbeing and investment. The Chamber is focused on rebalancing the system to reinvigorate the public company model.

Projects and Programs

 

Priorities for 2018

  • Alleviate the regulatory burden that is currently deterring companies from going public. Building off the success of the 2012 JOBS Act, the Chamber will advocate for a set of reform recommendations to help more companies go public.
  • Bring transparency and accountability to proxy advisory firms, modernize corporate disclosures, reform the shareholder proposal system, and expose special interest activism.
  • Enact legislation that provides broad relief to banks that offer critical main street financing, and pursue regulatory changes for those banks not afforded legislative relief.
  • Reform bank capital and liquidity rules to free up lending to small and midsize businesses, including by:
    • Pursuing legislation revising section 165 of the Dodd-Frank Act, such that application of enhanced prudential standards and supervision by the Federal Reserve is based on a multifactor risk assessment.
    • Advocating for recalibration of Basel III standards, the removal of these standards’ gold-plating by the Federal Reserve, broad relief for community banks, and reforms to the Dodd-Frank Act stress tests and comprehensive capital analysis and review.

Recent Activity

Above the FoldDec 11, 2017 - 9:00am
Mick Mulvaney

CFPB Drama Underscores Need for Greater Accountability

Following the resignation of Richard Cordray, it's clear the bureau should be led by a bipartisan commission.

Above the FoldDec 05, 2017 - 9:15am
Financing Mainstreet Agenda

Main Street Businesses Need Financial Regulatory Reform

The number of small business loans has decreased by roughly 43% since the last recession.

Above the FoldNov 29, 2017 - 9:00am
Retirement plan

Fiduciary Fallout: Getting Beyond the Numbers

We want people to save for their financial futures, not limit their choices.

Above the FoldNov 08, 2017 - 9:00am
"Retirement account" spelled out in Scrabble tiles.

Fiduciary Fallout: Increasing the Cost of Retirement

6 million investment accounts face higher costs because of the Labor Department's regulation.

Above the FoldNov 06, 2017 - 9:00am
The Chamber applauds the repeal of the CFPB's arbitration rule

A Victory for Consumers—and for Justice

The repeal of the anti-arbitration rule is a major step in the right direction. It is a victory for consumers and businesses of all sizes.

Above the FoldOct 25, 2017 - 9:00am
Fiduciary Rule Infographic

Fiduciary Fallout: Identifying the Problem and Finding a Solution

We must find a solution that preserves investor choice and allows savers to retire with dignity.

Above the FoldOct 13, 2017 - 10:45am
Header Photo

Dear Washington: Messages from Main Street on Financial Regulations, Part 2

One of the biggest challenges business owners face is accessing capital to grow their business.

Above the FoldOct 11, 2017 - 10:30am
Piggy bank on a pile of dollar bills.

Fiduciary Fallout: Labor Department’s Fiduciary Rule Straightjackets Investors

The key to a sound financial future lays in having a choice of savings options.

Above the FoldSep 15, 2017 - 3:00pm
Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) arrives to a Senate Banking Committee hearing.

Senator Warren, the Fiduciary Rule Leaves Retirement Savers Holding the Bag

Congress should work towards ways to make it easier for Americans to save for retirement.

Above the FoldAug 07, 2017 - 9:00am

Protecting Consumers’ Right to Arbitration

The average payout for consumers in class action lawsuits is about $32 while the average plaintiff’s lawyer pockets $1 million.