Regulatory Reform

The Chamber recognizes the need for smart regulations to ensure workplace safety and protect public health. But with a $2 trillion price tag in compliance costs and an increasing number of huge and complex rules, it’s clear the regulatory system isn’t working the way it should.

Americans deserve a working regulatory system that is fair for everyone, takes into account the views of communities and businesses, evaluates the impact rules will have on jobs and small businesses, and protects our economic and personal freedoms.

Projects and Programs

 

 

Priorities

  • Work with the administration and individual agencies on the various regulatory relief programs initiated by the administration in 2017.
  • When necessary, defend the regulatory relief actions both through the formal rulemaking process and ensuing litigation.
  • Continue to push for improved regulatory analysis in the rulemaking process, including the adoption of such analysis by independent agencies.
  • Advocate for broad-based regulatory reform, especially the enactment of the Regulatory Accountability Act.
  • Advocate for permanent reforms to the often-abused “sue and settle” process, especially enactment of the Sunshine for Regulatory Decrees and Settlements Act.

Recent Activity

Press ReleaseJan 09, 2020 - 10:00am

Donohue: 'Engaging with the world is our best strategy for strong national security and lasting prosperity'

Today U.S. Chamber CEO Thomas J. Donohue cautioned that the United States must continue to engage on the world stage or risk being left behind in his annual State of American Business Address.

SpeechJan 09, 2020 - 10:00am

2020 State of American Business Speech: A Year of Meaningful Action

U.S. Chamber President Tom Donohue's remarks on the State of American Business as prepared for delivery on January 9, 2020.

Above the FoldDec 18, 2019 - 12:00pm
Capitol

Congress Takes Key Steps to Propel American Businesses Forward with End-of-Year Legislation

Take a look at some of the Chamber's priorities that will be come law before the end of the year:

ReportDec 01, 2019 - 4:15pm

Policy Priorities for the New European Commission

Promoting Competitiveness & Transatlantic Cooperation

Letters to CongressNov 19, 2019 - 2:15pm

U.S. Chamber Letter on S. 982, the "Not Invisible Act of 2019"

This Hill letter was sent to the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, supporting S. 982, the "Not Invisible Act of 2019."

Letters to CongressNov 07, 2019 - 1:30pm

U.S. Chamber Letter on the Nomination of Paul Ray to be Administrator of OIRA

This Hill letter was sent to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, supporting the nomination of Paul Ray to be Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) in the Office of Management and Budget.

Letters to CongressOct 30, 2019 - 10:15am

U.S. Chamber Letter on H.R. 3055

This Hill letter was sent to the United States Senate, on H.R. 3055, the Commerce, Justice, Science, Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, Interior, Environment, Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Act of 2020.

Op EdOct 18, 2019 - 1:15pm

Jailing CEOs to Please the Masses

Elizabeth Warren was one of my best law-school professors, but her political ambitions seem to have suppressed her once-reasonable instincts, particularly regarding corporate regulation. One of her recent proposals, the Corporate Executive Accountability Act, would upend hundreds of years of U.S. legal tradition and wreak havoc in boardrooms.

Letters to CongressOct 08, 2019 - 10:00am

U.S. Chamber Letter on S. 209, the "PROGRESS for Indian Tribes Act"

This letter was sent to the House Committee on Natural Resources, supporting S. 209, the “Practical Reforms and Other Goals To Reinforce the Effectiveness of Self-Governance and Self-Determination (PROGRESS) for Indian Tribes Act.”

Above the FoldAug 27, 2019 - 3:30pm
derivitive swaps

How One Small Regulatory Fix Could Unlock $40 Billion for Growth and Job Creation

One regulatory glitch is locking up $40 billion that businesses could use for economic growth and job creation – here's how we fix it.