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International Affairs Division

The U.S. Chamber’s International Affairs Division advocates for free enterprise, competitive markets, and rules-based trade and investment as the path to opportunity and prosperity for all. The Division’s staff of 70 regional and policy experts advances these principles before the U.S. and foreign governments as it works to shape trade and investment policies and help companies succeed in international markets.

The International Affairs Division of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce leads the business community’s efforts to shape global policy. 

Headquartered near the White House—and with representatives in key foreign capitals—the U.S. Chamber’s International Affairs Division is a powerful advocate for international economic engagement. Our experts work with leaders in business and government to vigorously advance pro-business trade and investment policies that create jobs and spur economic growth.

With unparalleled access to key decision makers in the United States and abroad, we are working to expand U.S. companies’ access to the 95% of the world’s population that lives beyond our borders. We have made significant progress in recent years, but there is still much work left to do.

This is an exciting time to be conducting business internationally, and I encourage you to join with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in this great work. Together, we can create new opportunities around the globe.

Myron Brilliant

Executive Vice President and Head of International Affairs

About Us

The U.S. Chamber’s International Affairs Division has 70 policy experts and advocates based in our Washington, D.C. headquarters, as well as in Belgium, Brazil, China, Ghana, India, and Korea.

Key assets also include:

  • The American Chambers of Commerce Abroad, part of the U.S. Chamber Federation, includes more than 117 American Chambers of Commerce in 103 countries all around the globe.
  • The Chamber’s bilateral business councils work to advance commercial relations between the United States and key markets around the globe, including Bahrain, Brazil, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, India, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, South Africa, and Turkey.
  • The Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), an independent, non-profit affiliate of the U.S. Chamber, helps emerging nations develop the free market practices and democratic institutions they need to succeed in the global economy.
  • The U.S. Chamber’s International Policy Committee (IPC) develops our policy positions relating to international trade and investment and makes recommendations to the Chamber’s board of directors. 

International Priorities

  • Reach new trade and investment agreements to ignite U.S. economic growth, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, and the Trade in Services Agreement.
  • Revitalize the World Trade Organization with a focus on implementation of the new Trade Facilitation Agreement and concluding separate negotiations on trade in IT products and environmental goods.
  • Press for negotiation of strong investment treaties with China, India, and other countries.
  • Preserve continued access to trade finance through the U.S. Export-Import Bank.
  • Modernize export controls to enhance national security and competitiveness.
  • Renew the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB).

Services

  • Unparalleled advocacy on member issues in Washington and abroad
  • Customized business development and high-level government relations support
  • Access to heads of state and government and other senior foreign and U.S. officials
  • Regular updates on trade and investment developments globally

Timeline

The latest updates across all U.S. Chamber properties

E.g., 06/05/2016
E.g., 06/05/2016
Issue Brief

Given the trillions of dollars in trade and investment across the Atlantic, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and its members have a critical interest in the success of the EU’s efforts to boost growth and competitiveness. An energy policy that respects both economic and environmental objectives through increased transatlantic cooperation in energy security, energy trade, and the mutual development of new technologies through joint research should be central to that effort.

1 day 20 hours ago
Letter

On April 20-21, 016, the business leaders of the G7 countries and the EU, convened at Keidanren Kaikan in Tokyo to discuss the world economy, trade and investment, digital revolution and global issues. The attached communique details their joint recommendations in advance of the G7 Ise-Shima Summit to be held next month. 

1 week 3 hours ago
Event
7th China Business Conference banner

The China Business Conference is the premier forum on China’s business climate for American companies and overall U.S.-China economic and commercial relations.

1 week 2 days ago
Issue Brief

By Michael Shvartsman, Global Initiatives Intern

Eurasia is important to the global economy. Its developing nations account for an impressive 264 million people and $1.8 trillion in nominal GDP.

2 weeks 5 hours ago
Event

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the AMCHAM Myanmar Chapter of AMCHAM Thailand will host a webcast featuring U Kyaw Hoe, Chief Counsel for the NLD and member of the NLD Central Committee.

2 weeks 3 days ago
Event

Professor Bruce Rasmussen, the director of the Victoria Institute of Strategic Economic Studies, and a distinguished roster of experts will discuss how healthy, productive workforces drive economic growth.

2 weeks 6 days ago